LONDON COLLEGE OF FASHION WIG PROJECT

DAY 10-WIG PROJECT (The Foundation)


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From making the template of my head with the cling film, the second stage is to create the Foundation.  The foundation is made of a fine lace which the hairs can be knotted on to. It basically acts as a scalp. The lace has to be fine enough so that is is barely visible but strong enough to withstand daily brushing.

The wig I wear at the moment is not custom made which means it is a standard ‘one size fits all’. For those with a smaller head there are adjusters at the back to tighten the wig, also it is elasticated for extra security and to stretch to a bigger size. It is made by a company called ‘Trendco’ , it is a real hair wig with a monofilament top and a front lace. I really like this wig, it is by far the best wig I have ever had, although I have to say I have never tried the more expensive custom made wigs.

Below is a picture of the foundation of the Trendco wig foundation.

There are many different variations of foundations, obviously depending on the price of the wig.

After taking into consideration my wish list, determined on the first day of the project , Ann Marie and Pete had to think of the best possible solutions to overcome the problems I encounter with my standard Noriko wig.

Below is a list of problems and possible solutions.

PROBLEMS OF A TYPICAL FOUNDATION

  • Wigs can be very hot and itchy.
  • The lace at the front has a tendancy to fray and lose hairs, thus considerably shortening the life span of the wig.
  • There is NO hairline at the back and sides of the wig.
  • The foundation has a tendancy to stretch with age which makes them less secure.
  • Sometimes there is no suitable base for wig tape to adhere to.
  • Where the parting of the hair is the foundation is often too dark and unnatural looking

SOLUTIONS

  • Use a very fine, lightweight, breathable lace to keep the foundation as cool as possible.Stitch an inner layer of silk to the foundation to prevent any irritation from stitching of the galloon to the lace and hair knotting
  • Double over the lace where there is going to be a natural hairline to prevent it from fraying
  • Make the foundation the exact shape of original hairline and use high definition fine lace, the  same colour as the scalp to create the illusion of an invisible
    hairline, not only on the front but all around the wig, sides and back.
  • It is imperative that the foundation fits EXACTLY like a second skin on the scalp, this eliminates the need to use elastic. Lace does not stretch.
  • Again the inner layer of silk will create a good base for glue or tape to secure the wig to the scalp.
  • Use high definition lace, where the hair parting will be to create as natural a look as possible.

See below pics of trendco wig showing frayed front lace, the silk inset for comfort and security and the galloon and the stitching. The lace we are using is much much finer and lighter in colour to match my scalp.

As discussed earlier in the project Ann Marie is making the fantasy wig and Pete is making the everyday wig…….. Both foundations are made the same however the lace used in the fantasy wig is not as fine. Lace is very expensive so the budget has been split to be able to afford the best materials for my everyday wig.

This is the information based on the “Everyday Wig” that Pete is making.

Materials Used for the Foundation

  • High Definition Lace
  • Film Lace
  • Galloon
  • Transparent sewing thread
  • Needle

There are two types of lace used.

HIGH DEFINITION LACE

This is super lace, very fine french lace. When it sits against the skin it is almost invisible due to how fine it is and the colour match to my skin. This lace is used around the hairline, not just at the front but also the sides and back since a natural hairline is wanted all around (for when the hair is tied up in a ponytail). It is used in the parting area to create a parting as natural as possible. Hair knotted on this lace will be knotted singly since it has to look as real as possible.

FILM LACE

This is the next step down from the high definition lace, it is marginally thicker. Used on areas such as the crown this lace is ideal, it is a little stronger and the hair knotted here may be in 3 or 4 strands togethersince there is no need to be so particular.

GALLOON

A ribbon called Galloon helps to reinforce the strength of the foundation. The galloon also allows the wig maker to create individual sections of the wig for ease and then stitch them together eg Crown, 2x sides, front section and back . Since two types of lace are used the Galloon is needed to attach the lace together at the joins.

TRANSPARENT SEWING THREAD

This thread is strong and used to stitch the different foundation sections together. It is invisible against the high definition lace.

The foundation took Pete almost 20 hours to create! It is a very fiddly job entailing much dexterity and an abundance of patience!!!! It is fundamentally
that the lace does not tear otherwise it cannot be used.

To make things worse for Pete I had to leave London to go home for a week so Pete was under immense pressure to finish it before I got my train at 3pm on Sunday so that I could try it on!

Well done Pete!! 🙂

Here is the finished Foundation. Pete is a genius 🙂

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The Foundation end result is way beyond my expectations if I am completely honest. When I put it on my head it fits PERFECTLY. Unbelievably no alterations were needed. What impresses me the most is the hairline is barely visible. The colour of the lace is perfect against my scalp. It is so lightweight it feels like I have nothing on my head. When I raise my eyebrows, it doesn’t move which tells me we have not encroached on any skin on the face by accident. I cannot wait until Stage3, the knotting of the hair!!

So far Pete and Ann Marie have managed to deliver what they said they would, much to my disbelief….. If this project continues in this manner the end result is going to be extraordinary! 🙂

Thanks for reading this post!

Jayne Waddell

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